Sunset at Gowanus Bay

Sunset at Gowanus Bay
Sunset at Gowanus Bay, Henry Gritten, 1851

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Unplaced: Elias Brower/Brewer and Elizabeth Palmer/Parmer

Elias Brower and Elizabeth Palmer were married in New Jersey by license dated January 27, 1753. The ancestry or parents for neither Elias or Elizabeth are known. If we assume that they were both married when in their 20s then they were both born in the decade of 1723 to 1733.

The names recorded for both Elias and Elizabeth vary depending upon the record consulted. In the above mentioned marriage, Elias is recorded as "Liss" or "Lias" Brewer, while Elizabeth is "Elizabeth Palmer." Both were living in Monmouth County when married. "Lias" was a weaver at Middletown, while Elizabeth was of Shrewsbury. (Lias and Cornelia Winant posted the bond for Lias to obtain his marriage license. See Early NJ Marriages, #156).

The baptism records of two known children are found for Elias and Elizabeth. Marya, child of "Eelias Brower and Elesebeth Parmer," was baptized on April 30, 1764 (Records of the Reformed Dutch Congregations of Freehold and Middletown, New Jersey). On August 9, 1767, Catharina, child of "Elias Brower and Elizabet Parmer," was baptized, also at Freehold-Middletown. Neither baptism record listed sponsors or witnesses. As Elias and Elizabeth were married in 1753, and the earlier of the two baptisms is not found until 1764, an eleven year gap, it is probable that the couple had other children for who baptism records do not exist or cannot be found.

One likely child, is Isaac Brewer, who married prior to November 1794, Styntje (Christina) Van Brunt. Their son, Elias, was baptized on January 27, 1795 at Freehold-Middletown (his date of birth was November 3, 1794). He is likely a son of Elias and Elizabeth based upon the fact that he named his eldest known son, Elias, and named his second daughter Elizabeth (she was baptized on October 9, 1803 at Freehold-Middletown). Isaac and Styntje had seven children born between 1794 and 1809, and based upon this, both were probably born during the decade of the 1760s, which is still seven years after Elias and Elizabeth were married. Although this relationship is not proven, as of this writing, we know of no other family to which Isaac might belong.

An Elias Brewer is found on the tax lists at Shrewsbury in Monmouth County, New Jersey in the years 1780-1782, 1784-1786, 1789, 1794-1797 and 1808. Whether any, or all, of these appearances belong to this Elias Brower/Brewer is not certain. The location, however, does suggest that it may be this Elias Brower, and if not, it may they may pertain to another son.

From his given name, Elias, we have a clue that he most likely is a descendant of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, Long Island, and that he is also a descendant of Jan's son Derck Brouwer who married Hannah Daws, a daughter of Elias Daws. If born in the decade of 1723 to 1733 (give or take a year or two), it is apparent that Elias could be a grandson of Derck Brouwer and a great-grandson of Jan Brouwer. If we then take a moment to consider the sons of Derck Brouwer, we may be able to decide upon a place where Elias Brower belongs.

The eldest known son of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws is Jan Brouwer who married Aegje Sprong. Both Jan and Aegje died around 1732, and in his will (October 29, 1732), Jan names four children: sons Jan and Dirck, daughter Antje, and a "last and youngest son," whose name is not given. The three named children (Jan, Dirck, and Antje) are all said to have been raised in Hempstead, Long Island by their great-aunt Cornelia Brewer (widow of their great-uncle Hendrick Brewer). No mention is made of the "last and youngest son," and there may be a reason for that. At the time he wrote his will, Jan was living in Somerset County, New Jersey. At this time the extended Brouwer family had a presence in the area of Raritan (in Somerset County), in Monmouth County, New Jersey and on Long Island where the three named children were raised. If Aegje, the mother of the unnamed youngest child died during childbirth, and if that event occurred around the time Jan wrote is will (Jan was deceased within a month of the writing), then a home would have to be found for that newly born child, and a nursing mother would have to provided for him. A reason why the child did not have a name as of October 29, 1732, may be because he had not yet been baptized. And the reason he may not have gone to Long Island is because Cornelia Brewer was at this time an older woman who was not nursing. The "last and youngest son" probably remained in New Jersey with a family that included a nursing mother (in other words, a mother who had given birth at about that same time). The time frame is right, and assuming that this "last and youngest son" survived infancy and reached adulthood, he may be the Elias Brower that married Elizabeth Palmer in Monmouth County in 1753.

We do have to consider the other sons of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws. Son Elias, probably born about 1699, married Helena Willemse and did have a son named Elias who was baptized on December 25, 1740 at Readington, New Jersey. This Elias Brower is known to have married Phebe Lucas, had ten children, and lived in New Jersey, Cambridge, Albany Co., New York and later in Delaware Co., New York. The life of Elias Brower, son of Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse is well documented and accounted for. As he was married to Phebe Lucas on January 5. 1766, prior to the baptism of Catharina, the daughter of Elias Brower and Elizabeth Palmer (see above) it can be concluded that the two men named Elias Brower cannot be the same person, and we can eliminate Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse as parents of the Elias Brower who married Elizabeth Palmer.

Derck Brouwer's son Pieter Brouwer married Susanna Titsoort and had children baptized in the Raritan, New Jersey area from August 1732 until July 1747. None of the (seven) children are named Elias, but as we do not have a marriage record for Pieter and Susanna is is conceivable that they had earlier children. The unplaced Elias Brower could belong to the family of Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort. If not, Susanna would have been a nursing mother late in 1732, and the "last and youngest son" of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong could have been placed with this family.
.
Derck Brouwer's son Jacob Brouwer was married to Marike (surname not known) and had seven children baptized in the Raritan, New Jersey ares between August 1731 and January 1745. The same reasoning stated above for Pieter Brouwer and Susanna can be re-stated for Jacob and Marike. We have no marriage record, and therefore the couple may have had earlier children and Elias could be one of them. Marike had children in late 1731 and early 1733, and may have also been nursing when Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong's youngest son was orphaned. Perhaps Elias was born to or raised in this family.

After this exercise we are left with three possibilities. Elias could be the known but unamed son of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong, or he could be an otherwise unknown and unrecorded son of either Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort or Jacob Brouwer and Marike. More needs to be discovered with regards to these last two named families. As of now, we have nothing conclusive.

The family of Elizabeth Palmer has also not been discovered. As per her marriage license, she was living at Shrewsbury in Monmouth County in 1753. Also found there is an Isaac Palmer with a wife, Mary. The couple had three children, John, Henry and Hannah, baptized at Christ Church in Shrewsbury in 1746 and 1747. Isaac Palmer is on the tax list at Shrewsbury in January 1779 and in October 1780. In August 1743, Isaac Palmer, with Samuel Dennis and Samuel Pintard, witnessed the will of Anthony Pintard of Shrewsbury. Samuel Pintard was also a witness to the marriage license obtained by Lias Brewer and Elizabeth Palmer. I would suspect that Elizabeth and Isaac are somehow related, either as siblings or as father and daughter, and it is suspected that Elias Brower and Elizabeth Palmer did have a son named Isaac, a name which may then have come from the Palmer side of the family. One other note: On February 9, 1751, Lydia, "bastard daughter of Elizabeth Palmer, age 1 month," was baptized at Christ Church in Shrewsbury. I would suspect, though it has not been proved, that this is the same Elizabeth Palmer who married Elias Brower.

Elias Brower is an extremely important "unplaced" member of the greater BROWER and BREWER families of Monmouth County. He is very much likely a link between the earliest three generations and those who are found later in the 1800s, but who cannot yet determine their complete and correct line back to the earlier generations. Further information regarding the descendants of Elias Brower/Brewer and Elizabeth Palmer is always welcome. Of course if a direct male BREWER descendant of Elias is found, we would very much welcome him in joining the Brewer DNA Project. Y-DNA test results of such a person could help in solving the question of just who Elias Brower is.

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Unplaced: John Brewer, Revolutionary War Patriot, of New Jersey and Pennsylvania

Back in January 2012 I began the process of creating posts devoted to "Unplaced" Browers and Brewers (see the post of January 7, 2012). I have also created a label named "Unplaced" which can be found in the column at the right of this page, under Labels. Use this link to view all of the posts that fall under this category. Among those covered so far, who are known to be descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I. through Y-DNA testing of descendants, are William Brewer (1826-1886) of Louisiana and Texas, and Aaron W. Brewer (1828-1908) of Indiana and Illinois. It has been a while since I have added posts for other Unplaced Browers and Brewers, and I want to return to this starting with a John Brewer, who may also be a descendant of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

In 1818 John Brewer of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, age 68, applied for a pension for his service during the Revolutionary War. In March of 1776 he enlisted in New Jersey and served under Capt. Anthony Sharp in New Jersey's 3rd Regiment (the "Jersey Blues") which was formed by Col. Elias Dayton in Essex County. He re-enlisted on February 4, 1777 and served with Flanigan's New Jersey Line. He took part in the Battle of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. In September of 1820, John was age 71 and living in Lycoming Co., Pennsylvania when he amended a schedule of his property to his application. The above ages place John Brewer's year of birth as 1749 or 1750.

A D.A.R. application for a descendant of John Brewer is on file with the National D.A.R. I have not obtained the complete file, but mention of it, with a very brief (and incomplete) lineage can be found online (see John Brewer, Ancestor #A014118) at the DAR Genealogical Research System website. The filing member was Maude De Vee Tew Howard. This brief lineage gives John Brewer's date of birth as July 4, 1749 in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. He died December 12, 1822 at Selinsgrove, Union Co., Pennsylvania. (Union Co. was formed in 1813 from Northumberland Co. The borough of Selinsgrove is now in Snyder Co., which was formed out of Union Co. in 1855). The D.A.R. lineage includes a son, Matthew Brewer (1787-1849) who married Mary White. John Brewer's wife is named as Hannah Timpson (no vital dates supplied for her).

A John Brewer is found on the 1820 census at Loyalsock, Lycoming Co., Pennsylvania, although his age is understated if we assume that this record applies to this same John Brewer. The household consists of 1 male under age 10, 1 male age 10-15, 1 male age 26-44 (John would be over 45), 1 female under 10, 1 female age 10-15, and 1 female age 26-44. A second John Brewer is found in the same town with a household of 1 male age 16-25, 2 females under 10, and 1 female age 16-25  (clearly a much younger man, possibly a son?). In 1820, Mathew Brewer is found on the census at Charlestown in Penn, Union Co., Pennsylvania, with a household of 2 males under age 10, 1 male age 26-44, 1 female under 10 and 1 female age 26-44.

Jan Brouwer and Helena Van Cleef had a son Johannis baptized at the North Branch Reformed Dutch Church in Readington, Hunterdon County, New Jersey on December 26, 1749. Jan and Helena's sons Aris, Hendrick, Pieter and Benjamin, all much older then son Johannis, lived in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Johannis, however, has not been identified later in life.

Based upon the birth date and location given by the descendant of John Brewer (July 4, 1749 in Hunterdon Co.) and the baptism date of Johannis Brouwer (December 26, 1749 at Readington, Hunterdon Co.), and the fact that John Brewer enlisted in New Jersey with the 3rd Regiment, it may be that the two are the same individual. More evidence is needed to prove this, and any information or records regarding either John Brewer or Johannis Brouwer would be welcomed. Also, if a direct male descendant of John Brewer can be found, we would very much welcome his participation in the Brewer DNA Project.

Saturday, October 27, 2012

An Essay Towards an Improved Register of Deeds, City and County of New York

An Essay Towards an Improved Register of Deeds, City and County of New York, to December 31, 1799, Inclusive by Charles Fredric Grim, 1832, is available online at Google Books.

The book is simply an index to the deeds of New York County prior to the year 1800. In actuality there are two indexes, one for Grantors, the second for Grantees. The index for Grantors begins on page 2. The index for Grantees begins on page 169.

Having this book available online eliminates the time consuming need to consult the indexes for New York County Deeds that were filmed by, and are available through the Family History Library, at least for years prior to 1800.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Six Derck/Dirck Brouwers

Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans named one of their sons, Derck. The name which is also seen recorded as Dirck and Dirk, as well as Derick, is an equivalent of the English name, Richard. When encountering the name Derck (Dirck or Dirk) Brouwer (Brower/Brewer) during the course of researching in colonial New York or New Jersey, you can be near certain that the person with that name is a second, third, fourth or fifth generation descendant of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, Long Island. The purpose of this post is to recognize the six men named Derck/Dirck Brouwer found in the first four generations of the Jan Brouwer family, and to review some records pertaining to men with this name.

1- The first known Derck Brouwer, a member of the second generation descendants of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans, was born about 1666. He is no. 7 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.," and was the subject of the post of October 6, 2012. He married Hannah Daws and lived at Flushing and Jamiaca, Long Island as an adult and died sometime in either 1702 or 1703. Of the five known sons of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans, Johannes, Pieter, Hendrick (twice), and Derck, only Pieter and Derck left children. Of Pieter and Derck, the given name, Derck/Dirck/Dirk, appears to only be found among the descendants of Derck.

2- Among the third generation descendants of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans we find one Derck Brouwer. In 1738, on the muster roll for the Queens County militia, appears a man named, "Deric Brevar." In 1742, the property of "Derick Brewer," is described in deeds found in the Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead, Long Island, New York (Vol. 8, pp. 294 and 429). This Derck Brouwer is not identified with any other records and it is not known if he left a family. As he was an adult in 1738 (on the militia roll), then he must certainly belong to the third generation of descendants of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans. Placing him as a son of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws would imply that he was probably born between 1699 and 1703. (He is no. 31 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I."). It is possible that this Derck Brouwer left descendants. However, none have yet been identified.

In the fourth generation of descendants of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans, we have four men named Dirck Brouwer.

3- Dirck, the son of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong was baptized on June 27, 1729 at Raritan, Somerset Co., New Jersey. His parents died when he was just three years old and he was apparently raised on Long Island by his great-aunt Cornelia, a widow of his great-uncle, Hendrick Brouwer. Dirck lived at Hempstead (then in Queens Co., now in Nassau Co.) in the part that would be known for a period of time after the Revolutionary War as "South Hempstead." His wife has been stated to have been named Annatie, or Hannah, and her surname may have been, Miller (I have no credible evidence to confirm that her name was Miller except that this has been stated by a descendant). He is no. 97 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I."

4- Dirck, the son of Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse, was baptized on August 15, 1732 at the Reformed Dutch Church of Harlingen, New Jersey (Montgomery Twp., Somerset Co.). He is no. 99 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I." We do not know the name of the wife of this Dirck Brouwer and we cannot say with certainty that he even married or had children. At this point in time, based upon what limited evidence we have, we have reconstructed a family for this Dirck Brouwer (he may have appeared as Derick, Derrick or Richard BREWER in later records). The basis for this family begins with a descendant of David Brewer (no. 294 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.") who participated in the Brewer DNA Project, and had Y-DNA test results that confirm that he is a descendant of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I. In the direct BREWER lineage of this participant, is an ancestor named Jacob Jennings Warner Brewer (1815-1905), a grandson of David Brewer, who in his biography, written in 1899, stated that his great-grandfather was Derrick Brewer, "of Holland descent." David Brewer (the earliest confirmed ancestor for the participant) was born in 1762, and although he could be a son of either of the Dirck Brouwers, nos. 5 and 6, that follow, we presently place him as a son of this Dirck Brouwer based upon comparison of the Y-DNA results with other descendants of Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse. Another factor that influences this placement is the appearances of the name, Elias, among descendants of David Brewer. These, believed, descendants of Dirck Brouwer had moved westward (and it was likely Dirck would made the first move) and were found in western Pennsylvania, Vriginia (in areas now a part of West Virginia) and Indiana. It is emphasized here that the descendants shown for Dirck Brouwer, as found in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I." are not certain. Further evidence, documentation, and the participation of other descendants in the Brewer DNA Project is welcomed.

5- Dirck Brouwer, the son of Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort, was baptized on September 11, 1743 at the Reformed Dutch Church at Readington, Hunterdon Co., New Jersey. He is no. 116 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I." and his life as an adult has not been discovered. This Dirck Brouwer was probably born too late to be considered as the father of David Brewer mentioned above. It is not known if this Dirck reached adulthood. If he did, he could have moved westward into Pennsylvania, or he may have relocated to New York State. He has not been identified in records from New Jersey.

6- Dirck Brouwer, son of Jacob Brouwer and Marike (surname not known), was baptized on May 29, 1737 at Readington, Hunterdon Co., New Jersey. He is no. 107 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I." and his life as an adult has not been discovered. On January 4, 1769, administration on the estate of a Derrick Brewer of Somerset Co., New Jersey, was granted to John Dunn of Somerset Co. The fellowbondsman was Edward Higgins of Middlesex Co. The estate was very small, consisting of a "wheel and a grub hoe," and including balances due Derrick, amounted to two or three pounds. This Derrick Brewer was probably unmarried, with no heirs, and may still a have been a young man. He may have hired himself out as a laborer to local farmers. This Dirck Brouwer would have been aged 32 in 1769. I have placed this record of estate administration with him, but honestly, there is no certain way to determine if this is correct. This estate record could apply to either Dirck Brouwer no. 4 or no. 5 above (no. 4 would have been aged 37, while no. 5 would have been aged 26). If the estate record does not apply to this Dirck Brouwer, then he too may have reached adulthood, and may well have moved westward into Pennsylvania, or to New York State.

The following records pertaining to men named Derck Brouwer (and variants) do not contain enough genealogical information to assign them with absolute certainty to any of the above. However, we can make some educated guesses.

A- As mentioned above under no. 2, Derck Brouwer, a "Deric Brevar" (interpreted to mean Derick Brewer) was on the 1738 muster roll of militia for Queens Co., New York. The source for this record is New York Colonial Muster Rolls, 1664-1775 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2000), v. 1, p. 576. This record cannot pertain to Derck Brouwer, no. 1, as he was deceased, and it cannot pertain to nos. 3, 4, 5, or 6 as they were all too young to enlist in 1738. This record then becomes the identifying record for a Derick Brewer who is otherwise unknown. After estimating a reasonable time frame for his year of birth, then assuming he is a descendant of Jan Brouwer based upon his name, "Deric," we place him as a son, based upon both his given name and the fact that he lived in Queens County, as a son of Derck Brouwer, no. 1.

B- In 1742, the property of a "Derrick Brewer," is mentioned in a Queens Co. deed. Source for this record is "Jan Brouwer of Flatlands and Descendants," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol. 138 (2007), page 259, which cites Benjamin D. Hicks, Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead, Long Island, N. Y. 8 volumes, (Jamaica: Long Island Farmer Print, 1904), vol. 8, pages 294 and 429. (As of this posting I have not had the opportunity to view the original of this record myself). As with record "A" above, this must pertain to Derck Brouwer no. 2, based upon the year in which the record is dated (Derck no. 1 is deceased, while Dircks nos. 3, 4, 5 and 6 are too young).

C- On March 15, 1759, a Dirck Brouwer enlisted in the Kings County militia. His age was given as 26, height 5' 7 1/2", light complexion. Source is the above mentioned New York Colonial Muster Rolls, vol. 1, p. 901. The age here, 26 years in 1759, would imply that this record belongs to Dirck Brouwer, no. 4, who was born in Somerset County, but may well have returned to his family's origins in Kings County, Long Island by 1759. However, if that were the case, then he would likely not be the father of David Brewer who was born in 1762 in New Jersey and who moved westward. It may be then that this record belongs to Dirck Brouwer, no. 3. Although the age is understated by three years, the location is a better fit, as Dirck (no. 3) was known to have lived his adult life on Long Island (in Queens County which adjoins Kings County).

D- On January 4, 1769, administration on the estate of "Derrick Brewer" of Somerset Co., New Jersey was granted to John Dunn of Somerset County. Source is Honeyman, Calender of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc., Vol. 4, 1761-1770. Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 33 (Somerville, N. J.: The Unionist-Gazette Assoc., 1928), page 57. This is an abstract of File no. 356R. I have viewed the entire file, which is available on FHL film #0562751. The file is incorrectly titled, "John Dunn, Adm. Estate of Adam Brewer." There are two documents in the file, one being the inventory of the estate of "Richard Brewer, dec'd of Somerset County," the other being the appointment of John Dunn as administrator for the estate of "Derrick Brewer." No other persons named Brouwer or Brewer are mentioned in the file, and there is no clue to any family for Richard/Derrick Brewer. As mentioned above in no. 6, I have tentatively placed this record under Dirck Brouwer, bapt. in 1737, son of Jacob Brouwer and Marike. It could just as easily be assigned to Dirck Brouwer no. 5, the son of Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort, baptized in 1743. There really is no way to settle this with the known information available at this time.

E- A Richard Brewer is found on the Personal Property Tax Rolls in Frederick County, Virginia in 1783 (1 male over age 24). He is also there in 1788, 1789, 1792, 1793, 1794, 1795, 1796, 1797, 1798 and 1799. Source for these records is the "Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1850 for Frederick Co., Virginia", FHL film #s. 2024544 thru 2024548. This data was provided to me by Charles Wells. A John Brewer is found on the same lists, and no persons named Brewer are found there after 1799. These tax roll records most probably pertain to whoever the father of David Brewer, mentioned under Dirck Brouwer, no. 4, actually is (for now we are assuming he is Dirck Brouwer no. 4).

F- John Brewer of Perry Twp., Fayette Co., Pennsylvania was granted a pension for his service during the Revolutionary War. In his application for his pension he states that he entered service near Winchester, Virginia (in Frederick Co., Virginia), and that he served as a substitute for his father, Richard Brewer. At the time he was a resident of Fredericks, Virginia and was aged 16 years. John states that her served twice, each for a period on 18 months, and was at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. The date John first enlisted is not given. It is stated that he was age 16, and so had to have been born between 1760 and 1765 to have served during the Revolution (1776-1783). Independent research on the Brewers of western Pennsylvania, provided to me by Marie Fawcett and Nita Pugh, give John's date of birth as March 25, 1761 or 1762. He died on June 7, 1848 as per his widow's petition to continue receiving John's pension. Assuming that the correct year of is birth is 1761 or 1762, and assuming that his father, Richard Brewer, was aged between 18 and 40 years old when John was born, then we can say that John's father, Richard, was born sometime between 1721 and 1744. It is very likely that the John Brewer and Richard Brewer in this record are the same John and Richard Brewer in record "E" above, as there just were not a lot of people living in the area of Winchester, Virginia at the time of the Revolution (and a good percentage of them had roots in New Jersey). Dirck Brouwers nos. 3, 4, 5 and 6 all fall within the age range for John's father, Richard Brewer. If we stay with the theory that Dirck Brouwer no. 4 is the father of David Brewer, then the Richard Brewer found in this pension application would most likely be Dirck Brouwer no.4, and John Brewer and David Brewer would be brothers.

G- On January 31, 1779, George Washington Brouwer, son of Richard Brouwer and Mary Blann, was baptized at the Schenectady, New York Reformed Dutch Church. This same couple, had a son Petrus baptized at Schenectady in 1782, and a daughter Helena baptized at the Helderbergh Reformed Dutch Church at Guilderland, New York in 1787. In addition, a son of Derick Brewer and Maria Blain, named Derick, born on May 1, 1790 in New York (probably in Albany County) was baptized at the Helderbergh Church on April 17, 1795. Derick, later called Richard, along with his brother Peter, relocated to Florence, Huron County (later Erie Co.), Ohio, where late in his life he was celebrated as an early pioneer. A descendant of this Richard Brewer (b. 1790) has participated in the Brewer DNA Project and his results confirm that this Brewer line descends from Jan Brouwer of Flatlands. They also match the descendant of David Brewer (mentioned under no. 4 above) on 37 of 37  markers. The father, Richard Brouwer, also recorded as Derrick Brewer (baptism record), and Richard Brewer (census records), would have been born prior to 1759 (assuming he was aged 20 or older when son George Washington Brower was baptized). In an 1889 tribute to the son Richard Brewer (b. 1790) it was stated that Richard's father (Richard Brouwer) had fourteen children. We know of only four of them, and it may be that George Washington was not the first. The elder Richard is found on the 1820 census in Delaware Co., New York. He is not found on the 1830 census. It is conceivable that the elder Richard Brower was born as early as the 1740s, or even the 1730s (in which case he would have been in his 80s in 1820). The October 19, 2012 version of "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I." places Richard Brouwer (the father of the children in the baptism records above) as a son of Dirck Brouwer (no. 4 above and no. 99 in the document). This was based upon the fact that the descendant who participated in the Brewer DNA Project matched on 37 of 37 markers with the descendant of David Brewer. However, revisiting this now, I have concerns with the belief that Dirck Brouwer no. 4 was in Fredericks Co., Virginia prior to the Revolution, while Richard Brower is first found in the area of Schenectady and Albany, New York. It is possible that Richard Brower is either Dirck Brouwer no. 5 or Dirck Brouwer no. 6 above (it is also noted that Richard Brower named a son, Petrus (Pieter). At this time I believe it is prudent to remove Richard Brouwer (formerly no. 292) from the family of Dirck Brouwer (no. 4 above and no. 99 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.").

Source citations can be found at the Brouwer Genealogy Database website. Any changes mentioned above will be reflected with the next update.

What should be taken away from this exercise is that there is a lot of play between the various men named Derck, Dirck or Richard Brouwer with regards to where unplaced descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I. can fit. The various Dirck Brouwers, especially nos. 4, 5 and 6, can be juggled about to fit various circumstances as envisioned by various compilers. At this time different compilers can very easily come up with different scenarios, all of which are viable. The bottom line is that much more detailed information, in the form of actual records (as opposed to family tradition) has to be collected before any "correct" genealogy can be agreed upon.



Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The Family of Jan Brouwer and Helena Van Cleef

Jan Brouwer, probably born about 1698 (or a bit earlier) at Flatlands in Kings County, Long Island is a presumed son of Pieter Brouwer and Annatje Jans. Basis for this placement lies with the fact that Jan named a son Pieter, and that Jan and his wife Helena Van Cleef stood as sponsors at the baptism of Jan Brouwer, son of Hans Brouwer and Nelke Goulder.

Helena Van Cleef, the wife of Jan Brouwer, is likely a daughter of Isbrandt Van Cleef and Jannetje Arise (Aerts) Van der Bilt (Vanderbilt) of Gravesend, Long Island and later Freehold, Monmouth Co., New Jersey. Her identity is provided by the baptism records of her children. No baptism record for Helena has been found. While the inventory of the estate of "Isbrand Van Clave" of Freehold is dated January 13, 1729 in Monmouth County, no will or other estate settlement papers that mention a daughter Helena have been located. A marriage record for Jan and Helena has not been found.

Jan was at Middletown, Monmouth Co., New Jersey by September 1719, when his earmark for his livestock, "a fork or swallo tayl cut out of the topp of the left ear and half peny on the under file of the same ear and his brand mark is these letters J B on the right thigh," was recorded in the town records. Earmarks can be a valuable tool in genealogical research, especially in places where vital records are thin. They are generally passed along to heirs, and the later recording of an earmark with the same description, by a man with the same surname or by a man who married a daughter with the same surname as the original owner, is certainly a descendant of the earlier holder of the earmark.

Jan Brouwer and Helena Van Cleef had at least eleven or twelve children, and possibly more (as will be seen). Eleven recorded baptisms have been found. Five of the first six are in the records of the Reformed Dutch Congregations of Freehold and Middletown in Monmouth County.
The first, a child of "Jan Brouwer and ___ Van Kleave" was on June 21, 1724. Neither the child's name nor gender were recorded. No sponsors or witnesses were recorded.
The second, a child of "Jan Brower and Helena Van Cleve," no name or gender given for the child, was on April 11, 1726. Sponsors were "Isabrant Van Cleve and Janneke his wife," the mother's presumed parents.
The third child, Pieter, son of "Jan Brower and Hilletiz," was baptized in August 1727. No sposnors were recorded and this child, Pieter, did not reach adulthood.
Between the baptism of Pieter and the next child, there is a very obvious eight year gap in which no baptism records are found for Jan and Helena. There are only two possible explanations for a 18th century couple as who had as many children as Jan and Helena did (eleven known children) to experience such a long period without a verifiable child. Either Jan was away and the couple had no contact for eight years (extremely unlikely) or there were other children born in this period for whom baptism records were lost (much more likely).
The fourth baptism is of son "Henrikus" of "Jan Brouwer and Hillitje Van Kleef." This was on December 25, 1735 (eight years and four months after the baptism of Pieter). No sponsors were recorded.
The fifth baptism is of "Peeteres" of "Yan Brouwer and Leena," dated December 26, 1737, at the Reformed Church at Harlingen (Montgomery Township) in Somerset County, New Jersey. No sponsors were recorded.
The sixth baptism, Benjamin, child of "Jan Brouwer and Hilletje Van Kleef" is found at Freehold-Middletown on February 19, 1738. Sponsors were Benjamin Van Kleef and Rachel Couwenhove.
The seventh baptism, Marytje, child of "Jan Brouwer and Lena," is on October 3, 1738 at the Readington Reformed Dutch Church in Hunterdon County. No sponsors recorded.
The eighth baptism, Catrina, child of "Jan Brouwer and wife, Mardelena," is at the First Reformed Church at Raritan (Somerville), Somerset Co., New Jersey, June 28, 1741. No sponsors are recorded.
The ninth baptism is of "Leena" child of "Yan Brouwer and Leenaa," at the Harlingen Reformed Church on January 14, 1743. No sponsors.
The tenth baptism, dated December 10, 1746, is at Readington, for Elsje, child of "Jan Brouwer and Lena." No sponsors.
The eleventh, also at Readington, December 26, 1749, is for Johannis, child of "Jan Brouwer and Lena." No sponsors.

To the above we can add a son named Aris (Arie, Aaron) Brower. No baptism record is identified, but he may be one of the first two children, baptized in 1724 and 1726, whose given names were not recorded. Aris was married to Neeltje (Eleanor) Cooper and named his first daughter, Helena (1756) and first son, John (1762). If married by 1756 (baptism of first known child) then Aris would have been aged 30 or 32 if born in 1724 or 1726. He may have also been born in the eight year gap between 1727 and 1735. His given name, Aris, would have been from the family of his maternal grandmother, Jannetje Van der Bilt, a daughter of Aris (or Aert) Janse Van der Bilt and Hillitje Remse.

From the above list of baptisms a researcher might be alerted to the fact that the mother (Helena Van Cleef) is found with a variety of given names that at first look are seemingly in conflict. One might even be tempted to conclude that two different families are being described. But consider this. Helena had children born between the years of 1724 and 1749, a twenty five year span. If her first child was born while she was in her late teens, and her last while in her mid-forties, then we can conclude that Helena was born sometime between 1703 and 1708. We are handicapped by not having a surviving baptism record, but it is near certain that she was born in Kings Co., Long Island, during a period when Dutch culture was still dominant, and at the time she was born she was likely named, Hillitje, for her maternal grandmother, Hillitje Remse. The name Hillitje is more commonly a diminutive for Hillegond, which was an uncommon name even in the Dutch communities of the late 1600s. Today it might be described as archaic. It was certainly unheard of in English communities. In two of the first four baptisms (all at Freehold-Middletown) Helena is recorded as Hillitje. In another her given name is left out and in the other she is called Helena. In all of the baptisms found in the churches, a bit later in time and a bit further west in Somerset and Hunterdon Counties, she is called Lena (Leena) and in one case, "Mardelena" certainly a mistaken transcription for Magdalena. It is likely that as the descendants of the early Dutch settlers became more "English" in their habits and had more English neighbors with whom they associated, a name like Hillitje, might be reinvented as a similar sounding, Helena. In turn, Lena (Leena) is a diminutive, not only for Helena, but also for Magdalena ("Mardelena"), and so we can explain the unusual discrepancy in the recorded names given to the mother of the children of Jan Brouwer.

The last record for both Jan Brouwer and Helena Van Cleef thus far identified is the 1749 baptism of son Johannis Brouwer. No probate or estate settlement records have been found (in New Jersey or New York) for either Jan or Helena. We do not know when or where they died. As of 1749 it appears (from the baptism records of children) that they were living in the area of Raritan, New Jersey. It is possible that from here, they made a move further westward into Pennsylvania. However, families for four of their children have been identified and all are found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.

Of the children known to have left descendants, son Aris (Arie, Aaron) was married twice and died in 1800 as a resident of Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co. Of his seven known children, one son (John) and three daughters (Helena, Antje, Marya) left descendants in Monmouth Co. Son Hendrick was married to Abigeltie Hunt (also seen as Abigail Hurd) and died in 1802. He lived at Middletown in Monmouth Co. and had at least nine children, five of whom are known to have left descendants, including sons John, Sylvanus and Hendrick. Son Pieter (bapt. 1737) appears to have married Antje Van Dyck and had sons Joannes (Johannes) and Petrus (Pieter) baptized at Freehold-Middletown in 1756 and 1757, but no further records identified after that (this is not meant to imply that they do not exist, just that they have not yet been discovered). Son Benjamin married Maria Lane at Shrewsbury in 1767. They had at least five children who left descendants, including sons Cornelius, Jan and Benjamin, and are found in Monmouth County.

None of the four daughters, Marytje, Catrina, Leena and Elsje, nor youngest son, Johannis, have yet to be identified in adulthood. This statement is not intended to imply that none of them left descendants. Rather, it should be taken as an incentive for more research to be attempted regarding the descendants of Jan Brouwer and Helena Van Cleef.

Sources and citations for statements above, as well as more info on descendants, can be found at the Brouwer Genealogy Database website.

Family Group Sheet

Jan Brouwer is no. 22 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I. 

Also see Richard Brewer's Jan Brouwer Descendants, Pieter's Line

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Hans Brouwer and Nelke Goulder

Hans, the son of "Piter Brouwer and Antie Brouwers" was baptized on October 30, 1695. The baptism is recorded in the Flatbush, Long Island Town Records, Vol. 1. It can be found in published form in Voorhees, Records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Flatbush, Kings County, New York, Vol. 1, 1677-1720 (New York: Holland Society, 1998) at page 449. The sponsors at the baptism were Cornelis Willemse and Machiel Willemse. Although Dutch women are usually recorded with their own maiden names or patronymics, there are many records in which they are recorded with their husband's surname or patronymic. This baptism record is an example of such a situation. It is likely that the Clerk for the Town of Flatbush, at the time the record was initially recorded, was of English ancestry. Here then, the sponsors are Maghtel Brouwer, sister to the father of the child, and her husband, Cornelis Willemsen. And Hans' mother, Annetje Jans, is recorded as "Antie Brouwers."

The name, Hans, can be a shortened form of the name, Johannes (Jan, John, Johan). However, it can also be a name in it's own right, distinct from Johannes. In the case of this Hans Brouwer, the second scenario applies, as he had a brother named Jan/John, who was born about 1698. We know that Dutch families of the colonial period usually named their children for members of their families (living and deceased). The name, Hans, does not appear to have come from the family of his father, Pieter Brouwer. The name Hans, may then be a clue to the family of Hans Brouwer's mother, Annetje Jans. Two prominent families found in Kings County during the 1600s, in which the name Hans, was common, are the Bergen and Van Norstrand families. The former are descendants of Hans Hansen, sometimes called Hans de Noorman (his wife was Sarah Rapalje), while the later is the name adopted by descendants of Hans Jansen, also known as Hans Hansen, and Hans van Norstrand (he was married twice, first to Reymerigh whose family name is not known and second to Janneken Gerritse). The second and third generations of these two families would have to be researched completely to see if Annatje Jans might have a place.

To my knowledge, the given name, Hans Brouwer, is not found anywhere else in colonial New York, New Jersey or Pennsylvania. This exact name does not appear to have been passed on to any descendants.

The wife of Hans Brouwer was Nelke Goulder. She was a daughter of Joseph Goulder (said to be born April 1, 1674) and a first wife whose name has not been discovered. This Joseph Goulder, a son of Joaeph Goulder and Neeltje Claese, married as his second wife, Hannah Daws, whose first husband was Derck Brouwer, an uncle of Hans Brouwer. Nelke would have been named for her paternal grandmother, Neeltje Claese. No record of baptism is found for Nelke. As her father was of English ancestry and got his start at Gravesend, Long Island, the fact that there is no baptism record for Nelke is not surprising.

Hans Brouwer and Nelke Goulder relocated to Monmouth County, New Jersey. The baptism records of four children are found in the records of the Reformed Dutch Congregations of Freehold and Middletown. Daughter, Anke, no doubt named for her paternal grandmother was baptized on September 11, 1720, with sponsor "Anke Browers," who must be Hans' mother, again recorded with her husband's surname. The next two children baptized are examples of some of the frustration that comes with the records of the Reformed Dutch Church in the various New Jersey congregations. In neither case is the child's name recorded. The first baptism we know to be a son, baptized on January 27, 1723, no sponsors recorded. The second, a child, with neither the name nor gender recorded, was baptized in September 5, 1725. Again, no sponsors recorded. Hans and Nelke's fourth child was named Jan, and was baptized on November 28, 1731. The sponsors were Jan Brouwer and Hilletie Van Cleefe, his wife. Jan Brouwer, the sponsor, was a brother of Hans, and his wife was more often recorded as Helena Van Cleef.

After the baptism of November 28, 1731, Hans Brouwer and Nelke Goulder disappear from the records. No further record of them is known, or at least has yet been identified. Hans' patronymic would have been Pieterszen (Pieterse, Peters, Petersen or Peterson) and it has been mentioned, although unsubstantiated, that Hans' descendants adopted that patronymic as a surname. However, the descendants did not come into age until the mid 1700s, and that is pretty late, and a couple of generations away, from adopting a patronymic as a surname. A thorough and complete research project of all families with the Peters/Peterson (and variants) surname, in New Jersey, during the 1700s would have to be conducted to determine if there is any validity to this claim.

It is very probable that the son Jan, baptized in 1731, is the John Brewer of Monmouth County who married Ann Hulse, also of Monmouth County, with a New Jersey license dated March 1, 1764. This couple's daughter, Neeltje, was baptized on January 22, 1767 at Freehold-Middletown. While no sponsors were recorded, it is likely she was named for Nelke Goulder, the wife of Hans Brouwer. Other children for John Brewer and Ann Hulse have not been identified, and the origins of Ann Hulse, or Hulsaart (as she is called in the baptism record of her daughter) have not been determined. The "greater" Hulse/Hulst/Hulsaart/Holst/Holsaert family does have roots in Kings County, Long Island.

There are numerous Brewer (and Brower) families found in Monmouth County, New Jersey through the 1800s, many of them have not been placed either as descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands or of Adam Brouwer of Gowanus. Whether any of the unknowns descend from Hans Brouwer (through son Jan, or some other son as yet unknown) is certainly possible. DNA testing of known male descendants of Monmouth County, New Jersey Brewer and Brower families would certainly help.

Family Group Sheet

Hans Brouwer is no. 21 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

Also see Richard Brewer's Jan Brouwer Descendants - Pieter's Line

Source citations are found online at the Brouwer Genealogy Database website.

Monday, October 22, 2012

Jacob Brouwer and his wife, Marike

Jacob Brouwer is a presumed son of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws. No record of baptism has been found for Jacob and as no record of probate or estate settlement is known for either Derck Brouwer or Hannah Daws. Jacob's relationship as a son of Derck and Hannah cannot be stated with absolute certainty. The likelihood that he is a son is based upon his naming a son Dirck and a daughter Annatie (Hannah). If so, then Jacob was probably born between 1700 and 1703 in the vicinity of Flushing, Queens Co., Long Island.

Jacob Brouwer is found in Bridgewater Twp., New Jersey when his property is mentioned in a patent of 1749. However, he is not found on the list of Freeholders conducted there in 1753, and therefore may have moved from the area between 1749 and 1753.

Jacob's wife is identified simply as Marike (an equivalent of Mary or Maria). The identification is from the baptism record of their children. Her family name is not known. The couple had seven children baptized in New Jersey starting with Annatie in 1731 at Raritan (Somerville). She is followed by Sara in 1733 and Mareytye in 1735, both at Raritan, Dirck in 1737, and Elizabeth in 1739, both at North Branch (Readington), Sara (second) in 1742 at Raritan and finally Antje (second) at North Branch in 1745. In all of the baptisms, with one exception, no witnesses or sponsors are recorded. The exception being the baptism of daughter Elizabeth in 1739 where the sponsor is an Elizabeth Folkerson. The sponsor has not been identified with certainty, although an Elisabeth, daughter of Volkert Hendricksz Bries and Elizabeth Paulus was baptized at Raritan in 1703. It is probable that Elizabeth may be a member of the Bries family, whose descendants could have adopted the patronymic, Volkertsen or Folkertsen as a surname. Whether or not this is a clue to Marike's family is not clear at this time. As only one known son (Dirck) was born to Jacob Brouwer and Marike, and if we accept the assumption that he was named for Jacob's father, Derck, we do not have a possible name for Marike's father (which would be a second born son). Possibilities for Marike's mother's name are Sara and Elizabeth.

As mentioned above, it appears that Jacob Brouwer left the area of Raritan, New Jersey by 1753. Some families from this area of New Jersey did begin migrating westward into areas of Pennsylvania by this time and it is possible that Jacob followed this route. No probate or estate settlement records have been found for Jacob in New Jersey. If he can be located in Pennsylvania with some degree of certainty, then Jacob may be a missing link for some genetic descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands whose "paper trail" back to Jan Brouwer is not yet known.

Among those who may be a son of Jacob Brouwer is John Brewer of Scioto Co., Ohio. It is reasonable to suspect that John was born in the period of 1745 to 1755 (in New Jersey or Pennsylvania). John did name his eldest daughter, Mary, and he did name a son Jacob, and another son, Richard (Dirck/Derck). John Brewer of Scioto Co., Ohio has been featured in a number of blog posts here beginning in August of 2011. He was also a subject of "DNA Analysis: Adam Brouwer Berckhoven, Elias Brouwer of New Jersey, and John Brewer of Ohio," by Richard Brewer, Scott Kraus and William B. Bogardus, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol. 138, no. 4 (October 2007), page 245. Based upon what is known as of this writing, and acknowledging just how limited that information is, I am of the opinion that Jacob Brouwer is the most likely candidate to be the father of John Brewer of Scioto Co., Ohio. A goal for anyone interested in further researching this possibility, would be to locate Jacob Brouwer post 1753.

Family Group Sheet for Jacob Brouwer

Jacob Brouwer is no. 29 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

Details and source citations for the above can be found on the Brouwer Genealogy Database website. In addition there are three PDFs online regarding John Brewer, all of which are intended as working documents based upon was known at the time they are dated: Descendants, Descendant Chart, Family Group Sheet.

Saturday, October 20, 2012

Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort

Pieter Brouwer has been identified as a son of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws. The lack of a baptism record for Pieter, and of probate records for either Derck Brouwer or Hannah Daws prevents us from stating this relationship as absolutely certain. Pieter is placed in the family of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws based upon the fact that he (Pieter) named a son Dirck and a daughter Annatje (a name that was often used interchangeably with the name Hannah). Assuming that this placement is correct, it is probable that Pieter was born sometime during the period of 1700 to 1703 (inclusive), and in the vicinity of Flushing, Queens Co., Long Island.

Pieter Brouwer was married to Susanna Titsoort by 1732. A record of their marriage has not been found. Her identification is from the baptism records of the couple's children at Readington, New Jersey. Susanna was a daughter of Abraham Titsoort and Margriet Mark, and a granddaughter of Willem Titsoort and Neeltje Swart. (Details of these two families will be placed online with the next update of the Brouwer Genealogy Database website). Among Pieter and Susanna's children are a son named Abraham, and a daughter named Margrietje, both named for Susanna's parents. As with Pieter, a baptism record for Susanna has not been found. As her known children were baptized between the years 1732 and 1747, I would estimate that she was probably born during the first decade of the 1700s, and probably towards the middle of the decade.

Pieter and Susanna lived in New Jersey in the area of the Raritan and Readington Reformed Dutch Churches. In 1753, Pieter Brouwer is recorded as a Freeholder in Bridgewater Twp., in Somerset County. The couples first known child, Petrus, was baptized on August 6, 1732 at the Raritan Reformed Dutch Church (now in Sommerville, New Jersey). No sponsors were recorded. Son Abraham was baptized in 1734 at the North Branch (Readington) Reformed Church. The witness was Elizabeth Titsoort. Daughter Annatje was baptized in 1736, daughter Margrietje in 1738, daughter Maria in 1740, son Dirck in 1743, all at the North Branch (Readington) Reformed Dutch Church. No witnesses recorded for any of the baptisms. The youngest known child, daughter Marya, was baptized in 1747 at Raritan (Sommerville). No sponsors or witnesses recorded.

The last record thus far discovered for Pieter is the 1753 list of Freeholders at Bridgewater mentioned above. No record of probate or estate settlement has yet been discovered (at least not in New Jersey). Land records for the colonial period, in the counties of Somerset and Hunterdon, New Jersey, are thin. However, a thorough check of them should be conducted with the hope of finding more clues to whereabouts of Pieter and his children. As of this writing I have not identified spouses or families for any of Pieter and Susanna's children. As they were all born near the mid-1700s, the possibility exists that any number of them lived into the late 1700s or early 1800s. They may very well have left the area, perhaps migrating westward into Pennsylvania. It is also possible that Pieter and Susanna made such a move themselves. Based upon what little is known now, such a move cannot be ruled out. There are a number of descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands (as confirmed by DNA testing) that are still unplaced. That is, their direct lineage back to the progenitor, Jan Brouwer, cannot be determined by available genealogical records. The sons of Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort (Petrus, Abraham and Dirck) may be the missing links for some of these descendants. This is a family that is due the attention of some dedicated researcher who is willing to engage in some difficult research (the easy work has been done). I have no doubt that if more can be discovered regarding the family of Pieter Brouwer and Susanna Titsoort, some lingering questions regarding the unplaced descendants of Jan Brouwer will be answered. 

Family Group Sheet

Pieter Brouwer is no. 30 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I. (most recently revised on October 19, 2012).

One last note. In the past it had been mentioned to me that the children of Pieter Brouwer may have adopted Pietersen (Petersen or Peterson) as their surname. This would be the result of the children having taken their patronymic (Pieterszen/Pieterse) as a surname. As Pieter's children were all born in the 1730s and 1740s, long after the use of patronymics fell into disfavor, I tend to doubt this possibility. Although I can't rule it out completely, I believe that anyone researching this family would be better served by focusing on the Brouwer (including Brower and Brewer) surname before considering the Pietersen/Petersen/Peterson surname possibility.


Friday, October 19, 2012

Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse

Elias Brouwer is considered to be the second son of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws. He would have been named for his maternal grandfather, Elias Daws. No record of baptism for Elias Brouwer has been located. He was probably born in 1698 or 1699 at Flushing, Queens County, Long Island were his father is found on the census of 1698.

Elias Brouwer was married to Helena (Lenah) Willemse, who is very likely a daughter of David Willemszen and Marritie Pieterse Van Nest. Her parents were among the many families who migrated from Kings County, Long Island to New Jersey during the first decade of the 1700s. They are found in Somerset County, New Jersey in 1710. Helena's paternal grandparents were Willem Davidszen and Helena Aards of Flatlands, Long Island. Her maternal grandparents were Pieter Pietersz Van Nest who came to New Netherland in 1647, and Judith Jorise Rapalje a daughter of Joris Rapalje and Catalyna Trico who came to the fledgling colony of New Netherland in 1624, as two of the few, very first settlers.

Very few records for Elias Brouwer exist. In 1725 he purchased ten acres of land in Freehold from John Johnston, Jr., of Freehold. In the deed, Elias is recorded as "Elias Brewer, weaver." By 1732, Elias probably moved a bit further west into New Jersey, settling in the area of the Raritan and Millstone Rivers where five children were baptized. For more on the life of Elias Brouwer I would suggest Richard Brewer's, "About Elias3 Brouwer."

There are five known children of Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse. Son, Dirck (named for his paternal grandfather) was baptized in 1732 at the Reformed Dutch Church at Harlingen, New Jersey. The next four children were all baptized at the Readington Reformed Dutch Church in Hunterdon Co., New Jersey. Judick (Judith) was baptized in 1736, David in 1738, Elias in 1740, and Helena in 1744. The son David was no doubt named for his maternal grandfather, while the daughter Judick (Judith) would have been named for her great-grandmother, Judith Rapalje. The younger children, Elias and Helena, were certainly named for their parents. It is conceivable that other children were born to Elias and Helena for whom baptism records did not survive. There are four year gaps between the baptism dates of Dirck and Judick, and between the baptisms of children Elias and Helena. The baptism record of daughter Helena, in 1744, is the last known record found for both Elias and Helena (the parents). If we assume that the couple lived longer, and if Helena was only about 40 years old at that time, it is possible that one or two other children were born to the couple after 1744. If Elias and Helena had strictly followed the Dutch naming custom of the time, we would also expect to find daughters named Hannah (Anna) and Marritje (Mary) in their family. Since no baptism records have been located for two such daughters we cannot make the assumption that they existed. However, if unplaced women named Hannah Brouwer or Marritje Brouwer are found in later records, then the family of Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse would have to be considered as a home for them.

No will or probate file for Elias Brouwer or Helena Willemse has been found. Their dates and places of death are not known, and as mentioned above, they are last seen in 1744.

Descendants of Elias Brouwer and Helena Willemse have participated in the Brewer DNA Project. Richard Brewer, who is the administrator of the Brewer DNA Project is among them. We are always looking for additional participants in the effort to further collect Y-DNA data with the hope of refining the numerous lines of descent and to help place those whose Brouwer ancestry is still not certain.

Family Group Sheet

Elias Brouwer is no. 28 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

(Note: the current version of the Brouwer Genealogy Database does include supposed daughters Marritje and Hannah. As no evidence of their actual existence has been located they will be removed from the webiste with the next update).

Sunday, October 14, 2012

The Family of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong

Jan, the son of Dirck Brouwer and Hannah Daas, was baptized on June 9, 1695. Sponsors were Jan Brouwer (his paternal grandfather) and Jannetie Teunisse (his paternal aunt, the wife of Teunis Jansen). The baptism was recorded in the Flatbush Town Records, Misc. Vol. 1, 1652-1708, and has been published in Voorhees, Records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Flatbush, Kings County, New York, Vol. 1, 1677-1720 (New York: Holland Society, 1998), page 448.

That this Jan is the Jan Brouwer who married Aegje Sprong is supported by the fact that they named a son, Dirck, for Jan's father. No marriage record has been found for Jan and Aegje. She was the daughter of Gerrit Sprong and Annetje Teunise Covert, and was baptized on June 8, 1701 at the Brooklyn Reformed Dutch Church. Sponsors were Jan Hanze Bergen and Jannetje his wife (Jannetje being a sister of the child's mother). The Dutch name, Aegje, is equivalent to the English, Agnes.

Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong were married by 1726. Their son Jan was baptized on 20 March 1726 at the Reformed Dutch Church at Jamaica, Long Island. The sponsors were Jan Sprongh and Ante Sprongh (the child's maternal uncle, and probably his maternal grandmother recorded with her husband's surname).

By 1729, Jan and Aegje had relocated to New Jersey, and son Dirck was baptized on June 27, 1729 at the Reformed Church at Raritan (Somerville) in Somerset County. The names of any sponsors or witnesses were not recorded. Baptism records for other children have not been found.

Jan's will was written on October 29, 1732. He is titled, "John Bruer of Somerset Co., farmer." His wife is not named, and it may be presumed that she was deceased by this time. He names his children, John, eldest; Dirck, second; Antye; and "last and youngest son." The executors for the will were Johanes Colyer of Long Island and Tunis Post and Hendrick Bris both of Somerset County. Witnesses were Willem Post, Samuel Bruer and Cornelius Willemse.

Early accounts of Brouwer families have made errors in the placement of Jan Brouwer. William A. D. Eardeley in his Brower-Langdon manuscript, claimed that Jan was the son of Jacob Brouwer and Annatje Bogardus and mentioned another source that gave him a birth date of September 5, 1692. Hoffman, in "Brouwer Beginnings," TAG 23 (1947): 205 believed that this Jan Brouwer was probably the Johannes Brouwer who was baptized on September 18, 1687, a son of Willem Brouwer and Elizabeth Simpson and therefore a grandson of Adam Brouwer and Magdalena Verdon . This assumption, by Hoffman, was largely based upon the above mentioned will. Two of the executors, Johannes Colyer and Hendrick Bris, are members of Kings County families that had close associations with the family of Adam Brouwer. One of the witnesses, Samuel Bruer, was likely the son of Willem Brouwer and his second (third?) wife, Martha Bolten. However, another of the witnesses, Cornelius Willemse, was Jan's uncle by marriage, and the fact that Jan did name a son, Dirck (a name that is not found among the descendants of Adam Brouwer at this time) points to Jan being correctly identified as a son of Dirck Brouwer and Hannah Daws. This view is further supported by information that was not available to Hoffman or other early Brouwer researchers. That information being family notes relayed to William B. Bogardus by a correspondent, which state that the three children of Jan, namely John, Derick and Antye, were raised by their aunt, Cornelia Brouwer, the widow of Hendrick Brouwer, in Hempstead, Long Island. Hendrick and Cornelia were childless, and Hendrick was an uncle to Jan (John Bruer) the testator in the above mentioned will. Both of the accounts, Eardeley's manuscript and Hoffman's "Brouwer Beginnings," are incorrect.

The fact that a member of the Adam Brouwer family (Samuel Bruer) was witness to the will of a member of the Jan Brouwer family (John Bruer) simply underscores the fact that numerous families from Kings County, Long Island, and made moves to the area of the Raritan in New Jersey during the early 1700s. It should not surprise anyone that members of the two Brouwer families of Kings County made moves, and although not related, they certainly knew of, and likely interacted with one another. There is a tendency for researchers today to assume that anyone with the same surname found in the same document, such as a will or deed, are automatically related. This is not necessarily the case, and the will of "John Bruer," is an example of that.

It has been established from the baptism records and Jan's will, that he and Aegje Sprong had four children. Sons, Jan/John and Dirck/Richard both married, had children and lived at Hempstead, Long Island. They are the ancestors of the majority, if not all, of the Browers found in the "Five Towns" area of Hempstead along the south shore of Long Island through the 1700s and into the 19th and 20th centuries. As the daughter, Antje, was known to a Brouwer descendant, I would suspect that she too reached adulthood. However, to date, I have not been able to identify a husband or family for her. This leaves the fourth child, the "last and youngest son," named in John Bruer's will.Whether or not this son lived actually into adulthood is not known. As he is not mentioned by name in the will, it is conceivable that he was just recently born and not yet baptized, that his mother died in childbirth, and that Jan then felt the need to quickly write his will (he was deceased within the month himself). The above mentioned William A. D. Eardeley, in his Brower-Langdon manuscript, suggests that the unnamed son could be a James Brower who was found at Hempstead, Long Island from 1785 through 1820. James Brower was married to Sarah Smith and had ten children, the first baptized in 1785 at St. George's Episcopal Church in Hempstead. James Brower appears on the U. S. Federal census records in 1790, 1800, 1810 and 1820 at Hempstead. If born in 1732, James is age 53 in 1785 when his first child is baptized, age 72 in 1802 when his last child is born, and age 88 in 1820. Eardeley is probably missing a generation here, and although James Brower has not been placed in any other Brower family of Hempstead, it is very unlikely that he is the unnamed son of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong.

Family Group Sheet: Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong

Jan Brouwer is no. 27 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

Source citations are found at the Brouwer Genealogy Database website.

A direct descendant of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong has participated in the Brewer DNA Project. Results of his Y-DNA test confirm that the participant, and therefore all of his direct male Brower/Brouwer ancestors, are descended from Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Pieter Brouwer and Annetje Jans of Flatlands

Pieter Brouwer, was one of only two sons of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans of Flatlands, Long Island, who had children and descendants himself. Pieter was baptized on October 22, 1660 at the New Amsterdam Reformed Dutch Church. The sponsors were Thomas de Karmen and Sara Sanders, two individuals who had no known family relationship to either of Pieter's parents.

Pieter was, like his father, a blacksmith, and lived his life at Flatlands. In September of 1687, Pieter Brouwer took the Oath of Allegiance at Flatlands as a native. His property there is mentioned in a May 14, 1697 conveyance between Alexander Sympson of Flatlands and Evah Van Sycklen, the wife of Ferdinand Van Sycklen, in which the property in Flatlands being sold was stated to be bounded by the property of Peter Brewer and "John the shoemaker." In a conveyance of March 18, 1697/98 between Garret Schenck and Stephen Coerte (Van Vorhees), the property in Flatlands that was sold was bounded by that of John Wyckoff and Peter Brewer. On April 23, 1700, Jan Brouwer of Flatlands conveyed to Pieter Brouwer of the same place, lands bounded by Cornelius Coerte, Martens Schenck, Roelof Schenck, Claes Pieters, Ferdinand Van Sycklen, and Roelof Martense. The previous day, April 22, 1700, Jan had conveyed all of his smith's tools to Pieter. The conveyances were acknowledged on November 17, 1702. In effect, what was happening here, was Jan Brouwer was transferring his property and business to his son Pieter Brouwer, who would then be responsible for Jan's care until his death.

Pieter's wife was named Annetje Jans. Nothing of her parentage or ancestry has been discovered. A thorough study of the families of the men listed in the deeds above, as neighbors of Pieter Brouwer, might lead to the discovery of Annetje's family. T. G. Bergen, in his Early Settlers of Kings County, mistakenly places Annetje as a wife of Pieter Brouwer, son of Adam Brouwer and Magdalena Verdon. The two men named Pieter Brouwer were contemporaries, although Adam Brouwer's son Pieter was about fourteen years older then the son of Jan Brouwer. Adam Brouwer's son Pieter did not live at Flatlands at any time during his life. This error was corrected in later published accounts by Totten and Hoffman. On December 23, 1706, "Antye Browers," was recorded with 23 acres in an assessment at Flatlands. As she, and not Pieter, was recorded as the property holder, it can be assumed that Pieter Brouwer was deceased by this date.

The marriage banns of Pieter Brouwer, young man, at New Amersfoort (Flatlands), and Annetie Jansen, also residing there, were published at the Flatbush Reformed Dutch Church on February 15, 1687. They may have had as many as eight children, but baptism records have been found for only one. Son, Hans, was baptized on October 30, 1695. The baptism was recorded in the Town records of Flatbush and was published in the 1998 Flatbush Church Records, translated and edited by David William Voorhees. The sponsors were Cornelis Willemse and Machiel Willemse, the later being Maghtel Brouwer, Pieter's sister and the wife of Cornelis Willemse (Willemsen). Hans was married to Nelke Goulder and lived in Monmouth County, New Jersey (last found there in 1731). All other children of Pieter Brouwer are assumed. As no baptism records have survived and since no estate settlement has been located for Pieter, there is no direct evidence that they are children of Pieter Brouwer. Reconstructing Pieter's family is based upon circumstantial evidence for a few, and simply guesses for others. With that said, the following are presumed children of Pieter Brouwer and Annetje Jans.

Lucretia, believed to be the eldest child and daughter, was born August 12, 1688. The date is from a Luyster family Bible record. She was married to Johannes Luyster in 1716 at Flatbush, in which she is stated to have been born at New Amersfoort (Flatlands) in the marriage banns. The couple lived in Monmouth County where she died in 1771, in her 83rd year. Her husband was a son of Cornelius Luyster and Sara Nevius. Among Lucretia's children are Peter and Anna (named for her parents) and Cornelius and Sara (named for Johannes' parents. Lucretia's placement in the family of Pieter Brouwer is certain. As the eldest daughter, her name Lucretia (a female take on Lucas) may be a clue to her mother's ancestry.

Daughter Jannetje, was likely the second child and second daughter. She would have been named for Pieter's mother (Jannetje Jans) and was likely born about 1690 give or take a year or two. She was married on October 29, 1713 to Jan Gerritsen from Jamaica, Long Island, a son of Gerrit Lubbertsen and Geertruy Willemse Van Boerum. The marriage banns, recorded in the Flatbush Church records, state that she was born at New Amersfoort (Flatlands). The couple's first son, Gerrit, was baptized at Jamaica on January 2, 1715. Sometime after that date the family moved to Fordham Manor in Westchester County, New York. Baptism records in that location are not in existence, and no other baptism records for children are known. It is believed that Jan and Jannetje also had sons, Jan, Tunis and Peter (see the Brouwer Genealogy Database for details and sources). On September 5, 1759, Jannetje and Jan were members of the First Reformed Church of Tarrytown (the Old Dutch Church at Sleepy Hollow). This is the last known record of the two. Jannetje is placed in the family of Pieter Brouwer based upon her place of birth as per her marriage banns.

Pieter's son, Jan Brouwer, was married to Helena Van Cleef by 1724. No marriage record has been found, but the couple's first child was baptized at Freehold-Middletown in Monmouth County, New Jersey, on June 21, 1724. Neither the name nor sex of the child was stated in this record. A baptism of a second child on April 11, 1726 was similar in that neither a name or sex is recorded. One of these records may belong to a presumed son Aris (Arie, Aaron) who married Neeltje Cooper, lived at Shrewsbury in Monmouth County, and had children named Helena and John. Baptism records for nine other children of Jan Brouwer and Helena Van Cleef are found in the records of the Freehold-Middletown, Harlingen, Readington and Raritan reformed Churches in Monmouth, Hunterdon and Somerset counties, New Jersey. On November 28, 1731, Jan witnessed the baptism of Jan, son of Hans Brouwer and Nelke Goulder (Freehold-Middletown). Jan is placed in the family of Pieter Brouwer and Annetje Jans based upon this baptism and based upon the fact that he named two sons (one dying young) Pieter. No daughter named Annatje has been found, but one of the nameless children baptized in 1724 and 1726, could have had that name. Helena Van Cleef is believed to  be the daughter of Isbrandt Van Cleef and Jannetje Vanderbilt, although neither of these two given names (Isbrandt and Jannetje) appear among the children of Jan and Helena.

Possible daughter, Annatje, was married to Abraham Lane, by 1730. Their first known child, a daughter Jannetje, was baptized at Harlingen on April 15, 1730. Abraham was a son of Adriaen Lane and Martynetje Hendrickse Smock. A. Van Dorn Honeyman in his account of the Lane family (Somerset County Historical Quarterly Vols. 2, 3 and 4 [1913-1915]), places a "supposed" son named Adriaen, "who must have died young," in the family. This seems to have been a common technique for compiling families by earlier researchers such as Honeyman. That is, specifically in this case, the compiler notes that Abraham's father was named Adriaen, and then assumes that Abraham "must have" named a son for his father, even though no record of such son exists on it's own. Annatje and Abraham had children baptized in the Harlingen, Readington, Rariatn, Marlboro and Freehold-Middletown Reformed Churches. Abraham Lane of Middlesex Co., New Jersey left a will dated September 11, 1760, in which he names his wife, Hannah, and children Rebecca, Hannah, Mary, Jane, Lucretia and Abraham. Annatje also appears in records with her name recorded as Hannah and Johanna. There is admittedly no evidence, direct or circumstantial, to warrant her placement as a child of Pieter Brouwer and Annatje Jans. She is placed here as a possible daughter based upon the observation that she does not seem to fit into any other Brouwer family of the period, whether they be descended from Jan Brouwer of Flatlands or Adam Brouwer of Gowanus. She did name a daughter, Anna, but there is no record of her naming a son, Pieter. (The account of the family of Abraham Lane and Annatje Brouwer, found at the BGD website, will be adjusted with the next update of that website).

Pieter Brouwer, of Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, New Jersey is presumed to be a son of Pieter Brouwer and Anantje Jans. He was married to Antje Berge, but there is no record of any children. Peter and his wife were members of the Freehold-Middletown Congregation in 1731. He died intestate before September 22, 1759, when administration on his estate was granted to his widow, Anne. James Harkinson, Thunis Amack and John Hans, Jr. were bondsman. As with Annatje above, their is no direct or circumstantial evidence that helps us place Pieter in the family of Pieter Brouwer and Annatje Jans. It is largely based upon there being no other family to place Pieter in.

Hendrick Brouwer, married Rachel de Bon and had a daughter Sara baptized at Harlingen on October 25, 1727. The witnesses were Rachel Crom and Margaret Crom, which does not provide any clue to Hendrick's relationship to a Brouwer family. On August 3, 1766, a Hendrick Brewer witnessed the will of Johannes Luyster of Middletown, New Jersey. Johannes was a son of Lucretia Brouwer and Johannes Luyster mentioned above. We honestly do not know exactly who this Hendrick Brewer was. He may or may not have been the Hendrick Brouwer who married Rachel de Bon. The possibility that Hendrick is a son of Pieter Brouwer and Annatje Jans exists, but there currently is no known evidence to support the notion. He may well be a descendant of Adam Brouwer of Gowanus.

In May 1734, a Catherine Brewer (with Peter Johnson) witnessed the baptism of Lucretia Lane, daughter of Abraham Lane and Annatje Brouwer, at Harlingen, New Jersey. Based upon this, it is possible that Catherine was a sister to Annatje Brouwer. If we assume that the placement of Annatje as a daughter of Pieter Brouwer and Annatje Jans is correct, then Catherine would be a daughter of Pieter Brouwer and Annatje Jans as well. The placement, however, must be described as "possible." It is possible that Catherine had some other relationship to Annatje, and so this placement is weak.

While the placement of Hans Brouwer in this family is certain, and while I am comfortable with the placement of children Lucretia, Jannetje and Jan as very near certain children, the children Annatje, Pieter, Hendrick and Catherine mentioned above, can be at best described as possible, and better evidence is desired. It should not be ruled out that they might belong to other Brouwer families, descended from either Jan Brouwer of Flatlands or Adam Brouwer of Gowanus.

A Family Group sheet for Pieter Brouwer is online. He is found as No. 4 in Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands.

No confirmed direct descendants of Pieter Brouwer have yet participated in the Brewer DNA Project. We would love to find one, especially one descended from son Hans Brouwer, as he is the only child of Pieter for whom a baptism record exists. Including a descendant's Y-DNA data in the database we know have would be a welcome addition and may help us place some of the other unplaced descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands.

For corrections to this post, please see the post of September 15, 2013




Monday, October 8, 2012

Elias Daws of Gravesend, Long Island

Elias Daws was at Gravesend, Long Island in 1672. His daughter Hannah was the wife of Derck Brouwer, son of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans of Flatlands, and therefore it is essential for researchers of the descendants of Jan Brouwer to have some familiarity with Elias Daws.

Unfortunately, very few records for Elias Daws have been located. In 1672 he is recorded at West Meadows at Gravesend, Long Island, recorded as Elyas Daws and found listed between Nicles Stillwell and Wiliam Willkings. He is not found on the 1670 Gravesend Plow Land Division List. He is also not found on the 1677 Gravesend Land Allotments on an Island List, or on the 1695 Gravesend West Meadows Fence Shares List.*

On January 23, 1681, Elias Daas and Barbara Karsten were recorded as sponsors at New Utrecht for the baptism of Andries, child of Jan Karsten and Marie Elias Daas. This baptism was recorded in the Flatbush Reformed Dutch Church records.

On September 18, 1681, Rebecca (age 8 or 9), Patientia (age 6 or 7) and Annatje (age 4 or 5), the father of the three being Elias Daws at Gravesend, were baptized by the Reformed Dutch Church at Amersfoort (Flatlands), Long Island (Flatbush Reformed Dutch Church records).

The above three records constitute all that Elias Daws left in the form of records. The identity of his wife is not certain, but as three of his daughters each gave their own first daughters the name Hannah or Antje, the best bet would be that she was named Anna (or some variation thereof). There is no record of the settlement of his estate, and to my knowledge no record of his name appearing in land records (deeds). He was likely an Englishman, and as the first settlers at Gravesend were Baptists and Quakers displaced from New England (primarily Rhode Island), he may have at one time been there. However, I know of no record that has been found for Elias in New England.

Elias Daws left four daughters. The eldest, Maria, married Jan Carsten/Corson and had five children. The second oldest daughter, Rebecca, married Thomas Gandy, and appears to have had at least three (and probably more) children. These two daughters, Maria and Rebecca, relocated with their families to Cape May County, New Jersey around 1688 (and by 1694). The third daughter, Patience, married Pieter Couwenhoven, a son of Willem Gerritse Van Kouwenhoven and Jannetje Montfoort. The fourth daughter, Hannah (recorded as Annatje in her baptism record) married Derck Brouwer, the son of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans of Flatlands. The families and descendants of Patience and Hannah are primarily found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.

Elias' lasting significance to researchers today is his given name, Elias. The name is rather uncommon among Dutch families found in colonial America during the 1600s and 1700s. There are a few, but the appearance of the name is rare. The exception, however, is with the families descended from Elias' daughters Patience and Hannah. Here the Dutch tradition of naming children for their grandparents is evident, and the result is that today's researchers have a strong clue as to where persons named Elias, found in Dutch families in Monmouth County, New Jersey, can trace their origins.

Reconstructing the descendants of Elias Daws is difficult. He is not known to have had any sons and therefore the surname, Daws, disappears after the first generation. Incomplete records in Monmouth County, and even less complete records in Cape May County, make researching the descendants who lived during the 1700s difficult. Any attempt to reconstruct Elias' descendants will result in an incomplete account. So, with that in mind, here is a chart of some known Descendants of Elias Daws.

*The transcriptions of Gravesend records, along with a number of other transcriptions, primarily from Kings County locations, completed and generously placed online by Rene Dauven, can be found at her webpage, "Not My Family."

Sunday, October 7, 2012

Johannes Brouwer and Hendrick Brouwer, sons of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I.

Johannes Brouwer, the eldest son of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans, was baptized on May 26, 1658 at the New Amsterdam/New York Reformed Dutch Church. The sponsors were Nicholas Velthuysen and Grietje Jans. His younger brother, Hendrick, was baptized on January 14, 1665 at the same church. Here the sponsors were Albert Leenartszen and Ariaentie (whose surname or patronymic was not recorded). Of the four sponsors, none have been shown to have a family relationship to either of the parents, Jan Brouwer or Jannetje Jans.

Johannes, the elder of the two brothers, was married to Sara Willemse on September 2, 1683, with the marriage banns published at the Flatbush Reformed Dutch Church on August 12, 1683. Sara has been identified as a daughter of Willem Gerritsen and his wife Mary (surname not known) of Amersfoort (Flatlands), Long Island. Johannes Brouwer is found at Gravesend, Long Island in 1687 when he took the Oath of Allegiance. In 1688 he was a schoolmaster and reader at the Flatlands Reformed Church. He had been preceded in that position by Willem Gerritsen (Van Kouwenhoven) and was succeeded in 1691 by Pieter Tull. In 1693 he sold his house and garden lot at Gravesend to Stoffel Langestraat. When Johannes wrote his will on September 1, 1712, he was a resident of Hempstead in Queens County, New York. In his will he leaves his wife, Sarah, all of his estate, and then leaves it to his own brothers and sisters after her death. No children are mentioned. The will was proved on October 13, 1712.

Hendrick Brouwer, was the second son of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans who was given that name. A younger brother named Hendrick had been baptized on November 14, 1663 at the New York Reformed Dutch Church. The sponsors here were Pieter Symonszen and Debora Jans. Again, no relationship has been found between the two sponsors and the parents. The first son Hendrick certainly died in infancy, and this Hendrick was named in his honor. Hendrick Brouwer's wife was named Cornelia. Her surname (or a patronymic) has not been discovered. Hendrick took the Oath of Allegiance at Flatlands in 1687. In 1698 he is found on the census at Flatlands with a household of just one man. He therefore, married Cornelia after 1698. No record of their marriage has been found. Cornelia is mentioned as Hendrick's wife in his will dated September 12, 1738. At the time, Hendrick was living at Hempstead in Queens County, and his wife was left his estate until his "cousin John Brewer, son of John Brewer" attained the age of 22 years, at which time Cornelia was to retain one-third of the estate and the remainder was to go to "cousin John Brewer." In Hendrick's time, the term "cousin," was used more loosely then it is today. It was often used to describe person who, today, we would refer to as a nephew or niece. The "John Brewer," who received the property, was Jan Brouwer, baptized on March 20, 1726 at Jamaica, Long Island, the son of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong. Hendrick was the brother of his heir's grandfather, Derck Brouwer. "John Brewer" the heir, was Hendrick's great-nephew. This identification is collaborated by information I found in the collection of correspondence received from William Bogardus. Jan Brouwer, the father of Hendrick's great-nephew "John Brewer" had himself died six years before Hendrick in 1732. According to the notes of an ancestor of William Bogardus' correspondent, Cornelia, the widow of Hendrick Brouwer, raised Jan Brouwer's three children. Of the three, "John Brewer" would have been the eldest. Hendrick and Cornelia had no children of their own. The three (possibly four) children of Jan Brouwer and Aegje Sprong were no doubt raised as their own by Hendrick and Cornelia, and by Cornelia herself after Hendrick's death. Hendrick died by October 4, 1738, when his will was proved.

As can been seen from the above, neither Johannes nor Hendrick, two of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans' four sons to reach adulthood, had children.

Johannes and Hendrick can be found as nos. 3 and 6 respectively in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I."

Source citations can be found at the Brouwer Genealogy Database website. 

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws

Derck Brouwer, a son of Jan Brouwer and Jannetje Jans, was probably born about 1666 at Flatlands, in Kings County, Long Island. No record of baptism has been found. Despite the absence of a baptism record, Derck is certainly a son of Jan Brouwer. The circumstantial evidence being the fact that Derck named his eldest son, Jan (for his father), and lived at Flatlands as a young man. He cannot be a son of Adam Brouwer.

Only a few records have been found for Derck Brouwer. In September 1687 he took the Oath of Allegiance at Flatlands, and is recorded as "Dirck brouwer, native" (O'Callaghan, Lists of Inhabitants of Colonial New York...Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1979; page 39). Also listed as taking the oath from Flatlands are Jan Brouwer (Derck's father), and Pieter Brouwer (Derck's brother).
On September 25, 1694, Peter Carsten of Cape May, West Jersey, sold to Cornelis Williamsen and Dirck Brouwer, "two allotments of land lying and being in the limits of Gravesend upon Gisberts Island...land received from William Goulding living then in this towne of Gravesend" (Corson, Three Hundred Years with the Corson Families in America, Burlington, Vt: Free Press Interstate, 1939; page 2:21, citing Gravesend Book VI, p. 136). The Cornelis Williamsen in this deed was married to Derck's sister Maghtel Brouwer.
According to T. G. Bergen, Early Settlers of Kings County (1881), page 52, Derck married Hannah Daws on 6 October 1694 at Flatlands. Bergen does not provide a source for this date, and the original record has not yet been located.
In 1698, "Derick Brewer & his wife Hannah," with one child, are listed among the Dutch Inhabitants of the Town of Flushing, Queens County, Long Island (O'Callaghan, List of Inhabitants of Colonial New York..., page 40).
On September 22, 1700, "Dirrick Brewer of Jamaica (L. I.) and Hendrick Brouwer of Flatlands" sold a house and 75 acres on the borders of Hempstead, Jamaica and Flushing (Queens County Deeds Lib. A, pp.180-181).

Derck Brouwer's wife was Hannah Daws. She was the daughter of Elias Daws (of Gravesend in 1672) and Anna (whose family name is unknown). The given name, Elias, as it appears in the early generations of the descendants of Derck and Hannah, as it's origins with Hannah's father, Elias Daws. Derck probably died in 1702 or 1703 at Jamaica, Long Island (no record of his estate is found) and Hannah was remarried to Joseph Goulder, probably in 1704. With her second husband she relocated to Monmouth County, New Jersey and had five children. Hannah was deceased by October 22, 1716, when Joseph Goulder married, as his third wife, Maritje Van Dyke.

It is presumed that Derck and Hannah had five children. As the couple were married in late 1694 and as Derck was deceased in say 1703, they would have been married but nine years, and having five children would be about all a couple might have in that length of time. Of the children (all sons) a record of baptism is found only for the eldest, Jan, who was baptized about June 9, 1695 at Flatbush. The sponsors were Jan Brouwer and Jannetie Teunisse (Derck's father, and his sister who had married Theuinis Jansen Amack). The other four sons are assumed, and their placement as children of Derck and Hannah is based largely upon either their own given names, or names they themselves gave to their children (the grandchildren of Derck and Hannah). The four would be 1) Elias, certainly named for his maternal grandfather, Elias Daws, who married Helena Willemse. 2) Pieter, who married Susanna Titsoort and named a son Dirck, and a daughter Annatje (which name can be a variation of Hannah). 3) Jacob, whose wife was named Marike (family not identified) and who also named children, Dirck and Annatie. 4) Possibly, a Derck Brouwer who is found in Hempstead in 1742 when his property is mentioned in a deed, and who in 1738 was on the Queens County militia muster rolls. Another possible son could be a Samuel Brouwer/Brewer who appears in Raritan, New Jersey at the same time as the known sons of Derck (Elias, Pieter and Jacob). However, it is much more likely that Samuel is a son of Willem Brouwer and a grandson of Adam Brouwer, and his appearance at Raritan at the same time as Derck's sons is simply a coincidence as many families from Kings County were relocating to the Raritan area at the same time. (Families of the children of Derck Brouwer and Hannah Daws will be covered in future posts).

Derck Brouwer can be found as no. 7 in "Descendants of Jan Brouwer of Flatlands, L. I." (Note that this document is subject to change and future corrections). He is found as no. 3 in "Jan Brouwer of Flatlands and Descendants," New York and Genealogical Record, volume 138 (October 2007), pages 255-259. He can also be found at Richard Brewer's website, "Brewer Descendants of Johannes (Jan) Brouwer." A Family Group sheet is online as well.

Descendants have participated in the Brewer DNA Project. A chart with the participant's pedigrees is online at the Brouwer Genealogy Database website. Data can be found at both Jan Brouwer Group DNA Results, and at the Brewer DNA Project Results page. We are continuously looking for new participants for the Brewer DNA Project, especially those who can provide a confirmed line of ancestry back to the progenitor, Jan Brouwer of Flatlands. We would also like to find descendants of Jan Brouwer's son, Pieter Brouwer (wife Annetje Jans) to participate. Of Jan Brouwer's five (or six) sons, only Derck and Pieter are known to have descendants. Adding the data of individuals descended from Pieter, would be a valuable addition for the Brewer DNA Project.