Sunset at Gowanus Bay

Sunset at Gowanus Bay
Sunset at Gowanus Bay, Henry Gritten, 1851

Monday, July 24, 2017

Corrections to the Brouwer Genealogy Database

This post will serve as an ongoing report of corrections to the current edition of the Brouwer Genealogy Database (BGD). The BGD has become too large to update on a regular basis, although I hope to update it again at the end of this year. Since there are errors in the database, and since they should be pointed out and corrected, the best I can offer to do is to keep a running list of them on this post. I would ask readers who do find errors to use the Comments option for this post to bring them my attention and to the attention of others. I will then add individual corrections to this post as they come in. For a log of previous corrections please see this page on the BGD. Also see the Brouwer Genealogy post and comments of November 1, 2014.

The corrections that follow are to errors found in the current edition of the BGD. The date for this edition is 6 April 2016.

  • July 24, 2017. Correction to the date of birth for Moses De Clark. The date given of 27 July 1750 is clearly in error as his father was born in 1745 and his mother in 1744. The error is brought to my attention by Mitch Faulk who also provided a link to his Find-A-Grave page for Moses De Clark. The correct date of birth should be 2 December 1780. This is confirmed in George O. Zabriskie's article on the De Clark Family that was published in the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, volume 96, no. 4, October 1965 (see page 202). Moses De Clark was married to Nensje (Nancy) Brouwer (1783-1873) a daughter of Abraham Brouwer and Rebecca Stevens. Moses and Nancy had eight children born between 1803 and 1823. They lived in Rockland County, New York.
  • July 31, 2017. Annatje Van Gelder, daughter of Hendrick Van Gelder and Femetje Wynants did not marry John Bragier as stated by Arthur Pine Van Gelder in "Van Gelder Families in America," NYGBR 75 (1944), p. 172. John Bragier, a.k.a. John Brasher/Braasjer/Bresser (and other variations) married Annatje Van Gelder, daughter of Abraham Van Gelder and Catalina Post. This Annatje Van Gelder was baptized 8 July 1702, Reformed Dutch Church, New York City, and was deceased by 18 May 1737 when John Brasher married Susanna Baker. On 30 April 1735, Annatje Van Gelder, wife of John Brasjer, witnesses the baptism of Johannes, son of Johannes Boekenhoven and Elisabet Van Gelder. Elisabeth was also a daughter of Abraham Van Gelder and Catalina Post. Annatje Van Gelder and John Bragier had married on 2 December 1732. The will of Hendrick Van Gelder, dated 26 March 1739, names his daughter Hannah, a name often synonymous with Anna (Annatje). Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, Vol. 22, Marriage Records, 1665-1800, page 306 records the marriage of Samuel Pryer and Anne Van Gilder, both of Staten Island, on 3 March 1749. A. P. Van Gelder in "Van Gelder Families in America, assigns this marriage to Annatje Van Gelder, daughter of Hendrick, as well. Further research is need to confirm whether or not this is correct.
  • August 26, 2017. Garret Brouwer, son of Adolph Brouwer and Aeltje Hulst. Garret's date of birth should be changed from 22 February 1787 to 22 February 1793. The date is calculated from his age given at death. Garret died 18 January 1865, age 71-10-27, and not age 77-10-27.
  • August 26, 2017. John A. Brouwer (Brower), brother of the above Garret Brouwer. The date of John's marriage to Elizabeth Burdge should be changed to 8 January 1812 as found here at FamilySearch.org, where John's surname is incorrectly transcribed as "Browin." An image of the original document is available. John A. Brower's death is recorded as 20 November 1860 by his son, John S. Brower, in a Bible record. An alternate death date of 20 December 1860 can be found at FamilySearch. Thanks to April Santinon for bringing these changes to our attention. April also made me aware of an Adolphus Brower who died 5 April 1863, age 55, incorrectly transcribed as Adolphus "Braves" at FamilySearch. The record gives his parents as John and Elizabeth Brower, and his place of birth as Flatbush, Long Island. While the stated age at death (55 years) suggests born about 1808, the 1850 U.S. census gives his age as 38 (so born ca. 1812) and the 1860 U.S. census records Adolphus as age 40 (so born ca. 1820). Adolphus married Adelia Ann, a.k.a. Delia Smith and had eight or nine children. They lived in the Keyport, Middletown later Raritan Twp. area of Monmouth County, New Jersey, as did John A. Brower and his known sons, John S. Brower, Nehemiah Brower and Jacob B. Brower. It is strongly suspected that Adolphus is another son of John A. Brower and Elizabeth Burdge, however, a record or document proving this has remained elusive. More on these families can be found at Ancestry.com at John A. Brower and Adolphus Brower. John and Elizabeth's son Jacob B. Brower has also been significantly expanded. The information found at these pages supersedes that what is on the current BGD website (sorry, but a paid subscription to Ancestry.com is needed to access the pages). 
  • November 8, 2018. Caleb Pell Brower and Caleb S. Brower are two different men. Caleb Pell Brower is incorrectly stated to have married Mary Marschalk. He is incorrectly stated to have been enumerated in 1820 at Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., New York. Please see the post of November 8, 2018 for details.
  • December 7, 2018. Please see the comment below from Jim Hamstra dated December 3, 2018. Corrections and additions here are to the family of Nicholas J. Stansell and Susanna Erskine. Here is a link to the deed involving Eliab T. Stansell. Richard A. Stansell was a son of Henry Stansell and Mary Arnold White (and was not a son of Nicholas J. Stansell and Susanna Erskine. Here is the page for Nicholas J. Stansell and Susanna Erskine at WeRelate.
  • December 14, 2018. This correction involves the post of April 12, 2012, "The Family of Elizabeth Brouwer and Claes de Graaf of Schenectady." Thanks to Tanya Lowry who left a comment on December 13. There was some confusion regarding the children of Claes de Graaf and Elizabeth Brouwer that was initiated by Jonathan Pearson with his publication of his First Settlers of Schenectady in 1873. The Claes de Graaf whom Pearson places as a son, with the birth date of 4 August 1709, is actually a grandson, and a son of Jesse de Graaf and Aaltje Akkermans. He was baptized on 25 Dec 1706 at Schenectady and so could not have been born on 4 August 1709. So, "merge" Claes de Graaf, bapt. 1706 with Claes de Graaf, said to be born 1709. You may note that the younger Claes de Graaf's eldest son was named Jesse. The other questionable child named by Pearson is a Rebecca de Graaf, whom he states was born 28 February 1701. No source is cited for this date and no other record of this supposed Rebecca can be identified. Rebecca is actually Rebecca Groot, who was the wife of Abraham de Graaf, who is a another son of the elder Claes de Graaf and Elizabeth Brouwer. Rebecca is Claes and Elizabeth's daughter-in-law. Rebecca was a daughter of Abraham Groot and Hesterje Visscher, and we note that Abraham and Rebecca's first daughter was named Hester, while their second son was named Abraham, in honor of Rebecca's parents. Jonathan Pearson's books on the early settlers of Schenectady, and Albany, are handy references and a useful place to get an overview of any one of the many families who originate there, however, one does have to use them with caution and a competent family researcher will take the time to seek out verification for every placement Pearson suggests. 
  • December 19, 2018. Cornelius Simonsz Van Arsdalen and his wife Maritie Dirckse Ammerman, AND,  Cornelis Symonse Van Arsdale and his wife Marretje Dirkse, are the same individuals. The profiles for Cornelius and Cornelis and for Maritje and Marretje should be merged. Thank you to Pete Kuhlmann for pointing this out in the comments to the post of June 22, 2015.
  • February 27, 2019. A couple of corrections submitted by Peter Kuhlmann to the comments section of the November 1, 2014 corrections post (scroll down). Alice Longstreet, wife of Peter Wyckoff, is listed with a date of death of 16 June 1809. The source there was William Forman Wyckoff, Wyckoff Family in America (1950), pp. 420-21. Peter cites George C. Beekman, Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth County (1901), appendix xiv, who gives a date of death as 16 June 1820, age 78y 5m 3d. As both are "secondary" sources relying on other data, and subject to typographical and transcription errors, one might wish to seek out a more direct source to ascertain the correct date for Alice's death. Also, Daniel Remsen, b. 1665, had a wife named only as Jannetje here. James Riker, in Annals of Newtown (1852) p. 386, identifies Jannetje as Jane Ditmars. Riker is another one of those secondary sources that has some problems, so those interested may want to confirm that identification with more direct evidence.
  • July 20, 2019. As pointed out by Pete Kuhlmann (see comments below) Albert Albertszen (Terhune) and  Geertje Dircks did NOT have a daughter, Heyltje (bap. 1650). This baptism record belongs to Heltje Stoothof, a daughter of Elbert Elbertszen (Stoothof) and Aletje Cornelis Cool. Both are found on the BGD, in other words the one baptism is applied twice, in error. The child, Heyltie of Albert Albertszen and Geertje Dircks should be removed. Pete sites Harry Macy, Jr., and Renee L. Dauven, "Origin of the Amerman and Terhune Families, and Their Founding Mother Geertje Dircks," NYGBR 148 (Apr 2017): 97-98.

19 comments:

  1. Regarding the children of Nicholas J Stansell and Susannah Erskine Thayer (http://sites.rootsweb.com/~brouwergenealogydata/p604.htm#i163915):

    The younger son of these parents was Eliab T Stansell, not Richard Stansell. Eliab was born sometime before 1837 and died sometime before 1848. In 1837 a deed was issued to Jacob B Stansell and Elab T Stansell, brothers and minors. You can find an image of the deed at (https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MI0830__.107&docClass=STA&sid=kqjnjmlf.xiz). Eliab died young and did not marry.

    Richard Stansell was a son of Henry D Stansell and Mary Arnold White (http://sites.rootsweb.com/~brouwergenealogydata/p604.htm#i163916). Richard married Helen Pinney and died at Chickamauga in 1863, leaving his wife Helen a widow, with their young son Frederic Richard Stansell.

    You can learn more about these two Stansell families here (https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Family:Nicholas_Stansell_and_Susannah_Erskine_%281%29, https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Family:Henry_Stansell_and_Mary_White_%281%29)

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    1. Jim, thanks very much for the additions and the links.

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  2. I thought I'd post here also, While doing research on my family I was trying to validate the Maria Brouwer that Married Jacob Clute (verified by many sources, many sources sited her baptism date as the May 1, 1709, matching the church records here listed under Willem's children). there are many DAR/SAR records that list them as husband and wife. There are many ancestry records such as this of Jacob's dad:https://gw.geneanet.org/tdowling?lang=en&n=clute&oc=2&p=frederick

    this book available free on google shows that Frederic Clute's son Jacob married Maria Brouwer (page 6).

    here is a citation from the Hudson/mohawk Gendalogic and Family memories:https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/flhg-hudsonmohawki/?name=Maria+_Brouwer+Clute&treePerson=156999636_222063785708

    I have other sources that match on google, but haven't the time to find them all, please let me know, would love to finish this line.

    For what it's worth my DNA matches many others that have the same ansestors, including the Brouwers in them and we all have Maria in common. Thanks.

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    1. Nancy, thanks for your comment. The problem here starts with the source you mention, Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs. It's just not reliable, and is one of those old "sources" that is the source of many incorrect genealogies. Specifically, in the case of Maria Brouwer, they state that she is an heir to Anneke Jans. Well she isn't. The only Brouwer descendants of Anneke Jans are through Jacob Brouwer (Adam's son) who married Annetje Bogardus. Your suggestion that she is the Maria, daughter of Adam's son Willem, baptized in 1709 at Brooklyn, is plausible, however, that also mean that she cannot be a descendant of Anneke Jans. My suggestion follows Phyllis J. Miller, "Another Child of Pieter (Adam) Brouwer," published in the NYG&B RECORD, v. 120 (1989), p. 44. The author argues for Maria's placement as a daughter of Pieter Brouwer based on the naming of her children. Following tradition, her first daughter is named Nelletie (for Petronella Kleyn) and the second son is named Pieter (for Pieter Brouwer). And we see that the first son, Fredericus, and second daughter, Francyntie, are named for Jacob's parents (who are not disputed). What's good for the goose is good for the gander as they say, and so I think that Ms. Miller is correct, Maria's children tell us exactly who Maria's parents were. In addition, we do know that Pieter himself, and some of his other children, did have a presence in the Albany area, while we have yet to find any children of Willem Brouwer in the Albany area. DAR/SAR applications are also notoriously bad sources for colonial period ancestries. They are themselves usually compiled from books like the Hudson-Mohawk Families book you mention. And as these people lived prior to the Revolutionary War,I'm really not sure why they would be included in a DAR/SAR application anyway. As of now we still do not know what became of Willem's daughter Maria baptized in 1709. If she survived childhood, I would suspect that she would more likely be found in Staten Island, New Jersey, or the greater Philadelphia area, where some of Willem's children apparently went. I would suggest seeking out the article I mentioned. It's pretty persuasive, and it meets modern standards of genealogical research which books such as Hudson-Mohawk Families does not.

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    2. Thanks so much for all your information, I will go from there. Sorry for the delayed response, I thought google would notify me.

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  3. Thanks, I finally found and read the paper, compelling information. I still wish I could to find more actual records, especially given Petronella’s age and lack of baptismal records. But, as you advise it meets the criteria, I will use it… Maybe I will pay to have my brother’s Y-DNA tested. Would you like me to tell you if I do?
    Having grown up believing I was an heir to William Prince of Orange for the better part of 50 years, and having been an impressionable young woman, I do understand that it would be easy to "believe" that you are related and omit the "by marriage" IF she were Willem's child...lol. Originally, my Grand Aunt, who was a historian for the DAR, had linked us to Anneka Jans, (and the myth--WHICH I found out was a myth during my search, but after realizing I caught a mistake in her lineage). Her assumption was understandable since it was in early 1900’s that she was doing it and the information on the claims of being related to William Prince of Orange.
    As for the Hudson-Mohawk families, I only found that AFTER I read, “Register in Alphabetical Order, of the Early Settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N. Y., from Its First Settlement by Europeans to 1700: With Contributions to Their Biographies and Genealogies, Comp. from Various Source by Teunis G. Bergen S. W. Green's son, printer, 1881 - Brooklyn (New York, N.Y.) - ” AND found the baptismal records in the U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-1989, and YOUR SITE, but I missed the records for Peter and that document --maybe putting that reference in the section about Maria in Willems would help others like me? (and a link to the page, it wasn’t easy to find) At least I do try to research myself, rather than just choosing to believe, what others choose…I try to make certain I’d verified by current documentation carefully.
    Also, in regard to your statement about the parents not being part of the Revolutionary war and included DAR records, they always have you put in the parents of the soldier to verify lineage of that person by birth records or other similar proof of lineage.

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    1. A lot of people have been taken in by the Anneke Jans tales. The absolute best account of Anneke Jans, the one that truly describes an accurate account of who she was, is found in the noted Dutch historian Willem Frijhoff's "Fulfilling God's Mission: The Two Worlds of Domine Everardus Bogardus, 1607-1647," published in 2007. It is a big, heavy scholarly type book, but a must for anyone who wants to seriously explore who Anneke Jans and Dom. Bogardus were. Search for both Prof. Frijhoff and the book online.

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  4. Hello once again. In the NYGBR article in Oct 1964, Vol. 95, No. 4 - Relief Recipients in New Netherland, by Mrs. John Spell, page 193, she reports that Jacob Hellaker (Swart) and Sara Roelof were the sponsors at the baptism of Melchoir Kleyn, son of Uldrick Kleyn and Baefje Pieters. It seems to suggest that Jacob Helleker, in 1642, was married to Sara Roelof, referencing Danker and Sluyter - the article does not specifically say they were man and wife, but the flow of her narrative implies it? If Jacob was married to a Sara Roelof, it could not be Sara the daughter of Anneke Jans, since she was at that time married to Hans Kierstede. Do you have any thoughts on the likelihood of such a marriage and who this Sara Roelof might be? ..Pete

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    1. The year 1642 is the key here. It is still early in the settlement of New Amsterdam and the number of persons living there is still quite small. If you examine all of the baptism records from this time you will note that during THIS PERIOD, most of the sponsors at baptisms were NOT relations of the parents, and were NOT necessarily married to one another. When a sponsoring couple were married, the notation almost always says so, with the phrase "zyn huis vrouw," or z.h.v. (his house wife). For example, also in 1642, and about two weeks prior to the baptism you mention, the baptism of Cornelis, son of Egbert van Borsum, sponsors are "de Hr Willem Kieft, Commndr," who certainly is no relation, and "Jan Elpenbeen en zyn huisv., Marritje Thymens." If Jacob Hellaker and Sara Roelof were married, the record would have likely stated so with the phrase, "zyn huis vrouw." Examine all the baptism records from 1639 through the 1640s and 1650s, and you will see that many include sponsors who are not married to each other.
      This Sara Roelof married Hans Kierstede in the NA RDC on 29 June 1642. She appears in this baptism as sponsor, while her husband does not appear. She appears in four baptisms in 1642 alone (after June) and in three of the baptisms her husband is not a sponsor. In a fourth he is. In 1644, she appears in as a sponsor in four baptisms in which her husband does not appear. Jacob Hellaker also does not appear in any of these baptisms. Other men do, but they too are not married to a Sara Roelofs.
      There is no other evidence that there was another woman named Sara Roelofs in New Amsterdam during this period. Again, this was a small community, everyone would have known everyone else. As the wife of Hans Kierstede and the step-daughter of Dom. Everardus Bogardus, she would have been a prominent member of the community and so her appearance as a sponsor in numerous baptisms is not surprising.
      For more on Jacob Hellekers I'd suggest Epperson, Gwenn F.. "Jacob Hellekers Alias Swart and Some of His Descendants," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol. 121, pp. 13-18, 76- (1990). His wives were Aeltje Cornelis (m. 16 May 1638 in Amsterdam) and later Tuentje Teunis.

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  5. Hello. In your page on Angenietje Bennet (b. 3 Sep 1682), daughter of Adriaen Willemsen Bennet and Agnietje Jans Van Dyck you show her marriage to Hans Volkerts, son of Volkert Hansen and Sara Albertse Terhune. In NYGBR Vol.93 No 4 Oct 1962, page 200, Wilson Ledley suggests her husband to be Johannes Folkers, son of Folkert Dirck and Annetje Phillipse, and that is the source you list for the marriage. Ledley cites Andrew J. Provost in Early Settlers of Bushwick for the marriage, and on page 30 of Provost's document, he also shows the marriage to Johannes, so of Folkert Dircks and Annetje Phillipse. Is there some more recent research that alters the views of Provost and Ledley about the parents of the husband of Angenietje Bennet?

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    1. Peter. A few years ago, I had an extensive collaboration with Mike Morrissey and Liz Johnson regarding Leldly's run of articles in the NYGBR. We found numerous errors. Mike was working on publishing a corrected account of the family, but I don't know where that presently stands. I do know that it is quite an undertaking as the errors are frequent. Angenietje did marry Johannes Folkert. The discrepancy here is with his parents. We came to the conclusion that his parents were Volkert Hansen and Sara Albertse Terhune. That is based upon the names of their children. They have a son named Folkert and a daughter named Sara, while they do not appear to have a daughter named Annatje (for Annetje Phillipse). Short answer though, is that this family, and a lot of Bennet families need further work, and a better published account. And, there may well be discrepancies that cannot be solved.

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  6. Thanks again, Chris. I'll retain the Volkert Hansen - Sara Albertse Terhune parentage for Angenietje, and hope to eventually see a new account of the family. Do you think Mike Morrissey is likely to publish his account in NYGBR?

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    1. Well, if something does get published the NYGBR would be an appropriate place especially since Ledley's original work (which was based largely on a much earlier work of someone else) was published. If you search for Ledley using the search box on this site you will find a little bit more. I had once hoped to devote more time to sorting out the errors in the Bennet family on these pages myself, but that's gotten beyond me in the time since then.

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  7. More of Ledley. In your page on Elizabeth Brouwer (1695) who m. Jacobus Bennet, you show her parents as Abraham Brouwer and Cornelia Caljer, citing Ledley. But Ledley, in NYGBR 95(1) Jan 1964, shows her parents as Nicholas Brouwer and Jannetje Van der Hoven. Is this another of the errors you found in Ledley? The correct parentage being that shown in your file rather than Ledley?

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    1. It's an error in Ledley, who cites as his source Provost's, Early Settlers of Bushwick, which is yet another work that has errors. Abraham and Cornelia (Caljer) Brouwer's daughter Elizabeth married Jacobus Bennet. Nicholas and Jannetje (Caljer) Brouwer's daughter Elizabeth married John Parcell.
      Ledley apparently did little original research on the Bennets himself. He pretty much cobbled together material that he found in previously unpublished manuscripts (like Provost's and mostly the Andrew D. Chidsey manuscript at the NEHGS in Boston which Ledley mentions at 93:193). It's a minefield of problems. The Bennets need a new published genealogy that starts from the ground up. The references you find on the BGD refer to the places in Ledley where the individual to whom the citation applies can be found and that's all. In every case, what you find on the BGD supersedes Ledley, but comes with the caveat that this too is incomplete and subject to correction and additions.

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  8. On your page for Maria Janse Schenck, b. 8 Aug 1712, dau. of Jan Roelofse Schenck and Sara Willemse Van Kouwenhoven, you show her marriage, to Jacob Van Doren/Doorn before 1731. On your page for Rachel Schenck, b. 2 Apr 1710, daughter of Garret Roelofse Schenck and Neeltje Coertse Van Kouwenhoven you show her marriage to Jacob Van Doren 23 Oct 1763, without any mention that the 2 Jacobs could be the same man. In "The Rev. William Schenck, his Ancestry and Descendants", by Alexander D. Schenck, pub 1883; Appendix C page 143, the author records both marriages to Jacob Van Doren, son of Jacob Van Doorn and Maria Adriaense Bennet. Has the 2nd marriage, to Rachel Schenck been discredited, or are you aware of any reason I should consider this to be a different Jacob Van Doren? Regards. ...Pete

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    1. Since Maria Janse Schenck died in 1756, it is conceivable that Rachel Schenck's marriage to Jacob Van Doren in 1763 could be a second marriage for the husband of Maria Schenck. It was Rachel's second of three marriages. But I have not researched the Van Doren family much and so I can't say so with certainty. It is also conceivable that there are two men named Jacob Van Doren.
      My guess would be that they are one and the same, but I'd suggest searching for any other possible Jacob Van Dorens first, before coming to that as a final conclusion.

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  9. Hi again Chris,
    I saw someone use this page as a reference and I wanted to let you know that the death of Elisabeth De Graaf who married Nicolaas Stensel was more likely Nov or so of 1725 as that is when the records state the "twins" were born.
    In 171? ?? ???; Nicolaas Stensel; Elisabeth De Graaf, dau. of Claas were married according to the Schenectady Marriage records.http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~rbillard/schenectady_marriages.htmTranscription of the Schenectady Marriages

    Children:http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~rbillard/schenectady_baptisms.htm Transcription of the Schenectady Baptisms
    #1712 Mar 15; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Catharina (b);
    #1714 Jan 03; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Nicolaus (b);
    #1717 Jun 08; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Jesse (b);
    #1718 Dec 24; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Lysabet (b);
    #1721 Apr 02; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Eva (b);
    #1723 Mar 16; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Saartje (b);
    #172? ??? ??; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Wilhelmus (?) (b);
    #1725 Sep 30; Nicolaas Stensel, Elisabeth De Graaf; Thomas (?) (b);

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  10. Marie Benoit (bap 30 Nov 1698). You record a 2nd marriage for her, to George Brown on 3 Feb 1776, when Marie would have been abour 78 years old, but make no mention of a divorce and Richard Hilton is still alive. Marie was sponsor at the baptism of a Marie Bennewe (Benoit) on 15 Nov 1730, daughter of Pierre Benoit and Anna Fort - is it not more likely that this is the Marie Benoit that married George Brown in 1776?

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